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Sometimes I start looking around my home, just itching to get started on another project. And now that spring is officially here (according to the calendar), I know many of us are just dying to stretch our DIY wings and switch up a few things in our home.

So I thought I would share a simple chair-refresher that my mom, my sister and I completed in just a few minutes last fall. It was a really simple, easy, inexpensive way to refresh my mom’s old chairs.

First of all, let me reiterate that it was really, really easy. You don’t need a lot of DIY know-how or power tools to complete a simple chair transformation. All we used were a few yards of fabric (depending on the size of your chairs and how many you’re doing), foam, glue stick, scissors and a stapler. That’s it.

Our first step was to prep the chairs. For some, it may not take more than giving them a good dust-down. For these chairs, they were recovered once before, using a similar technique, so I just removed the screws holding the seat onto the chair and the outer material. It left us with the original chair, covered in a cream vinyl.

The original seat to the chair. Definitely needing some improvements!

The original seat to the chair. Definitely needing some improvements!

After making sure the seat was clean, I laid the seat (padded side down) on the foam, cutting an outline around the seat about 1-inch larger than the seat itself. The foam that we selected was a little on the thicker and heavier side, so it was very easy to cut with a serated-edged knife.

I cut an outline of the chair on the foam, about an inch larger than the seat itself.

I cut an outline of the chair on the foam, about an inch larger than the seat itself.

Once the seat outlines were cut out, I simply used a glue stick to attach the foam to the vinyl. Once the fabric is stapled down, the foam padding won’t move, but the glue stick helped hold everything together.

A simple glue stick was enough to keep the foam from moving.

A simple glue stick was enough to keep the foam from moving.

After the seats were glued together, we centered the pattern on the chair, leaving a good 4-5 inches around the outside. We started at the top and bottom, pulling the material snug, but not tight, and stapling it to the bottom side of the chair. I put two staples in the top and bottom, then two on each side. That keeps the material from shifting on you as you work your way around the chair.

Secure each side in the middle, top and bottom first, then each side.

Secure each side in the middle, top and bottom first, then each side.

Next you just work your way around the seat of the chair, stapling every inch or so, making sure that you keep the same amount of tension on the material all the way around.

The tricky part is the corners. You can do it one of two ways: 1) you can make a square corner, by folding the two ends, like you were closing a box lid, or 2) you can make a rounded corner, by stapling the center of the corner down, then working out in both directions, stapling frequently round, and continually pulling the material toward the center staple.

I stapled the center of the corner down, then each side, pulling to the center as I went along. It worked out very well!

I stapled the center of the corner down, then each side, pulling to the center as I went along. It worked out very well!

It really only took about 10 minutes per chair. Then we reattached the seats and stepped back to take a look at our handiwork.

A big improvement over the original!

A big improvement over the original!

A few minutes, a few dollars and a sigh of relief!

Val from Wag'n Tales

Mother of four boys, lover of all things agriculture and a firm believer that you need to find a silver lining for every rain cloud coming your way!

    Comments

  • Lana


    LOVE this idea!